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The extent and cost of common stigmas among university students

Ying Tang (), Sharon Stringer () and Tomi Ovaska ()
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Ying Tang: Youngstown State University
Sharon Stringer: Youngstown State University

Economics Bulletin, 2020, vol. 40, issue 3, 1924-1936

Abstract: Stigmatization indicates that a person possesses a condition or status that others devalue. This study explores different types of stigmatizing conditions and the co-occurring (intersectional) stigmas among 476 students attending a 13,000-student state university in North-East Ohio. In addition to studying the extent and intersectionality of stigma, the collected data is used to estimate some economic costs associated with it. The three most prevalent stigma conditions reported by students were depression, overweight, and poverty. Based on this study, these three conditions in particular identified in the study should be considered when setting up stigma prevention and intervention programs on university campuses. In addition to the personal benefits of an individual's healing, a simple cost analysis conducted in the study highlights very large financial returns to both universities and society of even moderate interventions.

Keywords: Cost analysis; Depression; Mental health; Obesity; Poverty; Resilience; Self-compassion; Stigma; University students (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: D6 I1 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2020-07-14
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