EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

A poorly understood disease? The impact of COVID-19 on the income gradient in mortality over the course of the pandemic

Paul Brandily, Clément Brébion, Simon Briole () and Laura Khoury ()

European Economic Review, 2021, vol. 140, issue C

Abstract: Mortality inequalities remain substantial in many countries, and large shocks such as pandemics could amplify them further. The unequal distribution of COVID-19 confirmed cases suggests that this is the case. Yet, evidence on the causal effect of the epidemic on mortality inequalities remains scarce. In this paper, we exploit exhaustive municipality-level data in France, one of the most severely hit country in the world, to identify a negative relationship between income and excess mortality within urban areas, that persists over COVID-19 waves. Over the year 2020, the poorest municipalities experienced a 30% higher increase in excess mortality. Our analyses can rule out an independent contribution of lockdown policies to this heterogeneous impact. Finally, we find evidence that both labor-market exposure and housing conditions are major determinants of the epidemic-induced effects of COVID-19 on mortality inequalities, but that their respective role depends on the state of the epidemic.

Keywords: COVID-19; Poverty; Mortality inequality; Labor market; Housing conditions (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: I14 I18 R00 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2021
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0014292121002257
Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

Related works:
Working Paper: A Poorly Understood Disease? The Impact of COVID-19 on the Income Gradient in Mortality over the Course of the Pandemic (2021) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:eee:eecrev:v:140:y:2021:i:c:s0014292121002257

DOI: 10.1016/j.euroecorev.2021.103923

Access Statistics for this article

European Economic Review is currently edited by T.S. Eicher, A. Imrohoroglu, E. Leeper, J. Oechssler and M. Pesendorfer

More articles in European Economic Review from Elsevier
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Catherine Liu ().

 
Page updated 2022-09-11
Handle: RePEc:eee:eecrev:v:140:y:2021:i:c:s0014292121002257