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Gender gaps across the earnings distribution for full-time employees in Britain: Allowing for sample selection

Yekaterina Chzhen and Karen Mumford ()

Labour Economics, 2011, vol. 18, issue 6, 837-844

Abstract: This paper investigates gender differences across the log wage distributions of British employees working full-time in 2005. The raw gender wage gap shows a tendency to increase across the distribution with a glass ceiling effect indicated. A strong relationship between high skilled, white-collar occupations and carrying out managerial duties with the glass ceiling effect is indicated in the data. After allowing for positive selection into full-time employment by British women, a substantially larger gender earning gap is found: the selection corrected gender wage gap is close to twice the raw gap across most of the earnings distribution. This selection corrected gap is found to be predominantly related to women receiving lower rewards for their characteristics than men. Indeed, the results suggest the gender earnings gap would all but disappear across the earnings distribution if women working full-time received the same returns to their characteristics as men working full-time in Britain do.

Keywords: Gender; Earnings; Wage-gap; Selection; Quantile; Distribution (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: J3 J7 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2011
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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:eee:labeco:v:18:y:2011:i:6:p:837-844

DOI: 10.1016/j.labeco.2011.05.004

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