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Do public health interventions crowd out private health investments? Malaria control policies in Eritrea

Alex Armand (), Pedro Carneiro (), Andrea Locatelli (), Selam Mihreteab and Joseph Keating

Labour Economics, 2017, vol. 45, issue C, 107-115

Abstract: Engaging in indoor residual spraying in areas with high coverage of mosquito bed nets may discourage net ownership and use. This paper analyses new data from a randomized control trial conducted in Eritrea, which surprisingly shows the opposite: indoor residual spraying encouraged net acquisition and use. One possible explanation for this finding is that there is imperfect information about the risk of malaria infection. The introduction of indoor residual spraying may have made the problem of malaria more salient, leading to a change in beliefs about its importance and to an increase in private health investments.

Keywords: Malaria; Bed nets; Indoor Residual Spray; Information; Beliefs; Behavior (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: D12 D83 H42 I12 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2017
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Related works:
Working Paper: Do public health interventions crowd out private health investments ? Malaria control policies in Eritrea (2015) Downloads
Working Paper: Do Public Health Interventions Crowd Out Private Health Investments? Malaria Control Policies in Eritrea (2012) Downloads
Working Paper: Do public health interventions crowd out private health investments? Malaria control policies in Eritrea (2012) Downloads
Working Paper: Do Public Health Interventions Crowd Out Private Health Investments? Malaria Control Policies in Eritrea (2012) Downloads
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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:eee:labeco:v:45:y:2017:i:c:p:107-115

DOI: 10.1016/j.labeco.2016.11.003

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