EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

‘Hate at First Sight’: Evidence of consumer discrimination against African-Americans in the US

Morgane Laouenan ()

Labour Economics, 2017, vol. 46, issue C, 94-109

Abstract: The paper tests evidence of customer discrimination against African-Americans in the US using a two-sector matching model with racial sector-specific preferences or abilities, employer discrimination, and customer discrimination. The test strategy makes it possible to disentangle customer from pure employer discrimination. This paper proves the existence of discrimination against African-Americans at job entry from both employers and consumers in the US. It also reports that racial prejudice has a quantitative effect on the relative employment and contact probabilities of African-Americans. A decrease in the intensity of discrimination by one standard deviation would raise the raw employment rate of African-Americans by 10% and would increase the proportion of African-Americans in jobs in contact with customers by 25%.

Keywords: Customer discrimination; Racial prejudice; Search model (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: J15 J61 R23 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2017
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0927537117301756
Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

Related works:
Working Paper: ‘Hate at First Sight’: Evidence of Consumer Discrimination Against African-Americans in the US (2017)
Working Paper: "Hate at First Sight": Evidence of Consumer Discrimination Against African-Americans in the US (2013) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:eee:labeco:v:46:y:2017:i:c:p:94-109

Access Statistics for this article

Labour Economics is currently edited by A. Ichino

More articles in Labour Economics from Elsevier
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Dana Niculescu ().

 
Page updated 2019-03-31
Handle: RePEc:eee:labeco:v:46:y:2017:i:c:p:94-109