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What distinguishes a serial entrepreneur?

Ari Hyytinen and Pekka Ilmakunnas ()

Industrial and Corporate Change, 2007, vol. 16, issue 5, 793-821

Abstract: We analyze serial entrepreneurship using a unique cross-sectional survey of employees that is for this study linked with longitudinal, register-based employer-employee data. Serial entrepreneurship accounts for nearly 30% of the transitions from paid employment into entrepreneurship. What make an entrepreneur serial are her aspirations and her ability to go ahead and live by them. Specifically, we document that having worked in the past as an entrepreneur increases both the probability that a person presently in paid employment aspires to again become an entrepreneur and , holding the aspirations constant, the probability of her again becoming an entrepreneur. We also find that an employee with entrepreneurial aspirations is more likely to become an entrepreneur subsequently, than an employee without such aspirations. Finally, holding aspirations constant, working in the public sector and being a union member are negatively correlated with the likelihood of transiting into entrepreneurship. Copyright 2007 , Oxford University Press.

Date: 2007
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Industrial and Corporate Change is currently edited by David Teece, Glenn R. Carroll, Nick Von Tunzelmann, Giovanni Dosi and Franco Malerba

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