EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

The growth and valuation of computing and other generic skills

Andrew Dickerson () and Francis Green ()

Oxford Economic Papers, 2004, vol. 56, issue 3, 371-406

Abstract: This paper describes a method for measuring job skills using survey data on detailed work activities, and using these measures examines whether the utilisation of skills is growing, and how they are valued in the labour market. We show that between 1997 and 2001 there was a growth in Britain in the utilisation of computing skills, literacy, numeracy, technical know-how, high-level communication skills, planning skills, client communication skills, horizontal communication skills, problem-solving, and checking skills. Computer skills utilisation was growing the fastest, and the use of computers was becoming more sophisticated. We re-evaluate the issue of whether computers have affected wages, taking into account existing critiques in the literature. We find that both computer skills and high-level communication skills carry positive wage premia, as shown both in cross-section hedonic wage equations that control for many detailed activities, and through a within-cohorts change analysis. Copyright 2004, Oxford University Press.

Date: 2004
References: Add references at CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (39) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/oep/gpf049 (text/html)
Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:oup:oxecpp:v:56:y:2004:i:3:p:371-406

Ordering information: This journal article can be ordered from
http://www.oup.co.uk/journals

Access Statistics for this article

Oxford Economic Papers is currently edited by A. Banerjee and James Forder

More articles in Oxford Economic Papers from Oxford University Press Oxford University Press, Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, UK.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Oxford University Press (). This e-mail address is bad, please contact .

 
Page updated 2019-09-18
Handle: RePEc:oup:oxecpp:v:56:y:2004:i:3:p:371-406