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The Impact of Farmer Field Schools on Knowledge and Productivity: A Study of Potato Farmers in the Peruvian Andes

Erin M Godtland, Elisabeth Sadoulet (), Alain de Janvry (), Rinku Murgai and Oscar Ortiz

Economic Development and Cultural Change, 2004, vol. 53, issue 1, 63-92

Abstract: Using survey data from Peru, this article evaluates the impact of a pilot farmer-field-school (FFS) program on farmers' knowledge of integrated pest management (IPM) practices related to potato cultivation. We use both regression analysis controlling for participation and a propensity score matching approach to create a comparison group similar to the FFS participants in observable characteristics. Results are robust across the two approaches as well as with different matching methods. We find that farmers who participate in the program have significantly more knowledge about IPM practices than those in the nonparticipant comparison group. We also find suggestive evidence that improved knowledge about IPM practices has the potential to significantly improve productivity in potato production.

Date: 2004
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Working Paper: The Impact of Farmer-Field-Schools on Knowledge and Productivity: A Study of Potato Farmers in the Peruvian Andes (2003) Downloads
Working Paper: The Impact of Farmer-Field-Schools on Knowledge and Productivity: A Study of Potato Farmers in the Peruvian Andes (2003) Downloads
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