EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Impact of Paternal Temporary Absence on Children Left Behind

Alison Booth () and Yuji Tamura

No 7440, CEPR Discussion Papers from C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers

Abstract: Using the first two waves of the Vietnam Living Standards Survey, we investigate how a father’s temporary absence affects children left behind in terms of their school attendance, household expenditures on education, and nonhousework labor supply in the 1990s. The estimating subsample is children aged 7-18 in households in which both parents usually coreside and the mother has not been absent. Our results indicate that paternal temporary absence increases nonhousework labor supply by his son. The longer the absence of the father, the larger the impact. One additional month of paternal temporary absence increases a son’s nonhousework labor supply by approximately one week. However, a daughter’s nonhousework labor supply is not affected. We find no evidence that paternal temporary absence influences his children in terms of school attendance or education-related household expenditures.

Keywords: child labor; human capital investment; parental absence; schooling; temporary migration; Vietnam; VLSS (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: I22 O15 P36 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-lab, nep-mig and nep-sea
Date: 2009-09
References: Add references at CitEc
Citations View citations in EconPapers (12) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://www.cepr.org/active/publications/discussion_papers/dp.php?dpno=7440 (application/pdf)
CEPR Discussion Papers are free to download for our researchers, subscribers and members. If you fall into one of these categories but have trouble downloading our papers, please contact us at subscribers@cepr.org

Related works:
Working Paper: Impact of Paternal Temporary Absence on Children Left Behind (2009) Downloads
Working Paper: Impact of Paternal Temporary Absence on Children Left Behind (2009) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:7440

Ordering information: This working paper can be ordered from
http://www.cepr.org/ ... ers/dp.php?dpno=7440

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in CEPR Discussion Papers from C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers Centre for Economic Policy Research, 77 Bastwick Street, London EC1V 3PZ..
Series data maintained by (). This e-mail address is bad, please contact .

 
Page updated 2018-02-08
Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:7440