EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Do Financial Incentives Crowd Out Intrinsic Motivation to Perform on Standardized Tests?

John List (), Jeffrey Livingston and Susanne Neckermann

Framed Field Experiments from The Field Experiments Website

Abstract: In the face of worryingly low performance on standardized test, offering students financial incentives linked to academic performance has been proposed as a potentially cost-effective way to support improvement. However, a large literature across disciplines finds that extrinsic incentives, once removed, may crowd out intrinsic motivation on subsequent, similar tasks. We conduct a field experiment where students, parents, and tutors are offered incentives designed to encourage student preparation for a high-stakes state test. The incentives reward performance on a separate low-stakes assessment designed to measure the same skills as the high-stakes test. Performance on the high-stakes test, however, is not incentivized. We find substantial treatment effects on the incented tests but no effect on the non-incented test; if anything, the incentives result in worse performance on the non-incented test. We also find evidence supporting the conclusion that the incentives crowd out intrinsic motivation to perform well on the non-incented test, but this effect is only temporary. One year later, students who had been in the incentives treatments perform better than those in the control on the same non-incented test.

New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-cbe, nep-exp and nep-hrm
Date: 2018
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://s3.amazonaws.com/fieldexperiments-papers2/papers/00643.pdf

Related works:
Journal Article: Do financial incentives crowd out intrinsic motivation to perform on standardized tests? (2018) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:feb:framed:00643

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in Framed Field Experiments from The Field Experiments Website
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Joe Seidel ().

 
Page updated 2019-09-16
Handle: RePEc:feb:framed:00643