EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Does the media matter? A field experiment measuring the effect of newspapers on voting behavior and political opinions

Daniel Bergan, Alan Gerber and Dean Karlan ()

Natural Field Experiments from The Field Experiments Website

Abstract: We conducted a field experiment to measure the effect of exposure to newspapers on political behavior and opinion. Before the 2005 Virginia gubernatorial election, we randomly assigned individuals to a Washington Post free subscription treatment, a Washington Times free subscription treatment, or a control treatment. We find no effect of either paper on political knowledge, stated opinions, or turnout in post-election survey and voter data. However, receiving either paper led to more support for the Democratic candidate, suggesting that media slant mattered less in this case than media exposure. Some evidence from voting records also suggests that receiving either paper led to increased 2006 voter turnout.

Date: 2009
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (74) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://s3.amazonaws.com/fieldexperiments-papers2/papers/00252.pdf

Related works:
Journal Article: Does the Media Matter? A Field Experiment Measuring the Effect of Newspapers on Voting Behavior and Political Opinions (2009) Downloads
Working Paper: Does The Media Matter? A Field Experiment Measuring the Effect of Newspapers on Voting Behavior and Political Opinions (2006) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:feb:natura:00252

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in Natural Field Experiments from The Field Experiments Website
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Joe Seidel ().

 
Page updated 2021-01-21
Handle: RePEc:feb:natura:00252