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The Extent and Cyclicality of Career Changes: Evidence for the U.K

Carlos Carrillo-Tudela (), Bart Hobijn (), Powen She and Ludo Visschers ()
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Powen She: University of Essex

No 2014-21, Working Paper Series from Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco

Abstract: U.K. data from 1993-2012 suggest that in economic downturns a smaller fraction of unemployed workers change their career when starting a new job. The proportion of total hires involving a career change also drops. This implies that career changes decline during recessions. The results indicate that recessions are times of subdued reallocation rather than of accelerated and involuntary structural transformation.

Keywords: Labour market turnover; occupational and industry mobility; wage growth (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: G10 J63 J64 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-ger, nep-hme and nep-lma
Date: 2014-08-27
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Related works:
Journal Article: The extent and cyclicality of career changes: Evidence for the U.K (2016) Downloads
Working Paper: The Extent and Cyclicality of Career Changes: Evidence for the U.K (2015) Downloads
Working Paper: The Extent and Cyclicality of Career Changes: Evidence for the UK (2015) Downloads
Working Paper: The Extent and Cyclicality of Career Changes: Evidence for the UK (2015) Downloads
Working Paper: The Extent and Cyclicality of Career Changes: Evidence for the UK (2014) Downloads
Working Paper: The Extent and Cyclicality of Career Changes: Evidence for the U.K (2014) Downloads
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DOI: 10.24148/wp2014-21

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