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Can Data Sharing Help Financial Institutions Improve the Financial Health of Older Americans?

Larry Santucci ()

No 17-1, Payment Cards Center Discussion Paper from Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia

Abstract: This paper explores how increased data sharing among financial institutions could improve the financial outcomes of older adults suffering from cognitive impairment. Among the first signs of cognitive impairment in older adults is a decline in financial capacity, which is also a risk factor for abuse or exploitation. Banks and other financial institutions are at the front lines to monitor and detect changes in financial capacity and susceptibility to fraud and abuse. However, industry experts have found that, in many cases, no mechanism exists for financial service providers to communicate signs of cognitive impairment, abuse, or fraud to family, financial caregivers, or other financial institutions. Creating a regulatory environment whereby financial institutions can more easily share data among themselves could be an important component of a more comprehensive strategy to bridge the communication gap and reduce the frequency and severity of financial losses for older adults.

Keywords: elder fraud; financial exploitation; Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act; data privacy (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: D18 G18 J14 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-age
Date: 2017-11-09
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