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The Importance of Geographic Access for the Impact of Microfinance

Nargiza Alimukhamedova (), Randall Filer and Jan Hanousek

Economics Working Paper Archive at Hunter College from Hunter College Department of Economics

Abstract: The geographic distance between a household and financial institutions may constitute a significant obstacle to achieving the benefits of modern financial institutions. We measure the impact of distance-related access to microcredits in Uzbekistan. Residents living closer to microfinance institutions are propensity score matched to those further away using both household and village characteristics. Households located nearer to microfinance institutions have larger businesses in terms of income, profits and employees than similar households located further away. In addition, they spend more on most forms of consumption and have greater savings.

Keywords: microcredit; microfinance institutions; geographic access (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: C34 O16 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2016-11-07, Revised 2016-11-07
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-cwa, nep-mfd and nep-ure
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Related works:
Working Paper: The Importance of Geographic Access for the Impact of Microfinance (2016) Downloads
Working Paper: The Importance of Geographic Access for the Impact of Microfinance (2015) Downloads
Working Paper: The Importance of Geographic Access for the Impact of Microfinance (2015) Downloads
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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:htr:hcecon:445

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