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Do Minimum Wage Increases Influence Worker Health?

Brady P. Horn (), Johanna Maclean and Michael Strain
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Brady P. Horn: University of New Mexico

No 10479, IZA Discussion Papers from Institute of Labor Economics (IZA)

Abstract: This study investigates whether minimum wage increases in the United States affect an important non-market outcome: worker health. To study this question, we use data on lesser-skilled workers from the 1993-2014 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Surveys coupled with differences-in-differences and triple-difference models. We find little evidence that minimum wage increases lead to improvements in overall worker health. In fact, we find some evidence that minimum wage increases may decrease some aspects of health, especially among unemployed male workers. We also find evidence that increases reduce mental strain among employed workers.

Keywords: minimum wage; self-reported health; differences-in-differences (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: I1 I11 I18 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-hea
Date: 2017-01
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Related works:
Journal Article: DO MINIMUM WAGE INCREASES INFLUENCE WORKER HEALTH? (2017) Downloads
Working Paper: Do minimum wage increases influence worker health? (2016) Downloads
Working Paper: Do Minimum Wage Increases Influence Worker Health? (2016) Downloads
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