EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Inefficiency and Self-Determination: Simulation-based Evidence from Meiji Japan

Eric Weese (), Masayoshi Hayashi and Masashi Nishikawa
Additional contact information
Masashi Nishikawa: Department of Economics, Aoyama Gakuin University

No DP2015-35, Discussion Paper Series from Research Institute for Economics & Business Administration, Kobe University

Abstract: Does the exercise of the right of self-determination lead to inefficiency? This paper considers a set of centrally planned municipal mergers during the Meiji period, with data from Gifu prefecture. The observed merger pattern can be explained as a social optimum based on a very simple individual utility function. If individual villages had been allowed to choose their merger partners, counterfactual simulations show that the core is always non-empty, but core partitions contain about 80% more (postmerger) municipalities than the social optimum. Simulations are possible because core partitions can be calculated using repeated application of a mixed integer program.

New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-cmp
Date: 2015-08
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
https://www.rieb.kobe-u.ac.jp/academic/ra/dp/English/DP2015-35.pdf First version, 2015 (application/pdf)

Related works:
Working Paper: Inefficiency and Self-Determination: Simulation-based evidence from Meiji Japan (2016) Downloads
Working Paper: Inefficiency and Self-Determination: Simulation-Based Evidence From Meiji Japan (2015) Downloads
Working Paper: Inefficiency and Self-Determination: Simulation-Based Evidence From Meiji Japan (2015) Downloads
Working Paper: Inefficiency and Self-Determination: Simulation-based Evidence from Meiji Japan (2015) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:kob:dpaper:dp2015-35

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in Discussion Paper Series from Research Institute for Economics & Business Administration, Kobe University 2-1 Rokkodai, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 JAPAN. Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Office of Promoting Research Collaboration, Research Institute for Economics & Business Administration, Kobe University ().

 
Page updated 2019-07-20
Handle: RePEc:kob:dpaper:dp2015-35