EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Inappropriate Pooling of Wealthy and Poor Countries in Empirical FDI Studies

Bruce Blonigen and Miao Wang ()

No 10378, NBER Working Papers from National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc

Abstract: This paper examines the question of whether less-developed countries' (LDCs') experiences with foreign direct investment (FDI) systematically different from those of developed countries (DCs). We do this by examining three types of empirical FDI studies that typically do not distinguish between LDCs and DCs in their analysis. First, we find that the underlying factors that determine the location of FDI activity across countries vary systematically across LDCs and DCs in a way that is not captured by current empirical models of FDI. Second, the effect of FDI on economic growth is one that is only supported for LDCs in the aggregate data, not DCs. Third, the evidence suggests that FDI is much less likely to crowd out (more likely to crowd in) domestic investment for LDCs than DCs.

JEL-codes: F2 O4 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2004-03
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-dev and nep-ifn
Note: ITI
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (71) Track citations by RSS feed

Published as Moran, T., E. Graham and M. Blomstrom (eds.) Does Foreign Direct Investment Promote Development? Washington, DC: Institute for International Economics, 2005.

Downloads: (external link)
http://www.nber.org/papers/w10378.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
Working Paper: Inappropriate Pooling of Wealthy and Poor Countries in Empirical FDI Studies (2004) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:nbr:nberwo:10378

Ordering information: This working paper can be ordered from
http://www.nber.org/papers/w10378

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in NBER Working Papers from National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA 02138, U.S.A.. Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by ().

 
Page updated 2021-01-21
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:10378