EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Should History Change The Way We Think About Populism?

Alan de Bromhead and Kevin O'Rourke

No 31148, NBER Working Papers from National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc

Abstract: This paper asks whether history should change the way in which economists and economic historians think about populism. We use Müller’s definition, according to which populism is ‘an exclusionary form of identity politics, which is why it poses a threat to democracy’. We make three historical arguments. First, late 19th century US Populists were not populist. Second, there is no necessary relationship between populism and anti-globalization sentiment. Third, economists have sometimes been on the wrong side of important policy debates involving opponents rightly or wrongly described as populist. History encourages us to avoid an overly simplistic view of populism and its correlates.

JEL-codes: D72 N40 N70 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2023-04
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-cdm, nep-his, nep-hpe and nep-pol
Note: DAE
References: Add references at CitEc
Citations:

Downloads: (external link)
http://www.nber.org/papers/w31148.pdf (application/pdf)
Access to the full text is generally limited to series subscribers, however if the top level domain of the client browser is in a developing country or transition economy free access is provided. More information about subscriptions and free access is available at http://www.nber.org/wwphelp.html. Free access is also available to older working papers.

Related works:
Working Paper: Should history change the way we think about populism? (2023) Downloads
Working Paper: Should history change the way we think about populism? (2023) Downloads
Working Paper: Should history change the way we think about populism? (2023) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:nbr:nberwo:31148

Ordering information: This working paper can be ordered from
http://www.nber.org/papers/w31148
The price is Paper copy available by mail.

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in NBER Working Papers from National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA 02138, U.S.A.. Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by ().

 
Page updated 2024-05-08
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:31148