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On the Motivations for the Dual-Use of Electronic and Traditional Cigarettes

David Ronayne () and Daniel Sgroi

No 830, Economics Series Working Papers from University of Oxford, Department of Economics

Abstract: Abstract We apply a classical economic categorization of preferences to identify the motivations of dual-users of electronic and traditional cigarettes. The responses of 2,406 U.S. adults (including 413 dual-users) in 2015 were collected using a novel online survey along with a follow-up in 2016 of 143 of these adults (68 dual-users). A sizeable minority of 37% of dual-users reported viewing electronic and conventional cigarettes primarily as complements. Of those who had never smoked or used electronic cigarettes, only 27% thought the complementarity motive would be primary. Dual-user motivations were associated with quit-attempt, cessation methods, gender and age. One year on, there was a positive relationship between the level of complementarity in the dual-user’s motives and their change in self-reported cigarette consumption. It is concluded that the application of a canonical economic classification of preferences may reveal important heterogeneities among the dual-user population.

Keywords: smoking; complements; substitutes; dual-use; preferences (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: I12 I18 D12 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-hea and nep-mkt
Date: 2017-08-21
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Journal Article: On the motivations for the dual-use of electronic and traditional cigarettes (2018) Downloads
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