EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Global Demographic Change: Dimensions and Economic Significance

David Bloom and David Canning ()

No 10817, NBER Working Papers from National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc

Abstract: Transitions from high mortality and fertility to low mortality and fertility can be beneficial to economies as large baby boom cohorts enter the workforce and save for retirement, while rising longevity has perhaps increased both the incentive to invest in education and to save for retirement. We present estimates of a model of economic growth that highlights the positive effects of demographic change during 1960-95. We also show how Ireland benefited from lower fertility in the form of higher labor supply per capita and how Taiwan benefited through increased savings rates. We emphasize, however, that the realization of the potential benefits associated with the demographic transition appears to be dependent on institutions and policies, requiring the productive employment of the potential workers and savings the transition generates. Economic projections based on an "accounting" approach that assumes constant age-specific behavior are likely to be seriously misleading.

JEL-codes: J11 O40 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-dev
Date: 2004-10
Note: AG LS
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (36) Track citations by RSS feed

Published as David E. Bloom & David Canning, 2004. "Global demographic change : dimensions and economic significance," Proceedings - Economic Policy Symposium - Jackson Hole, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, issue Aug, pages 9-56.

Downloads: (external link)
http://www.nber.org/papers/w10817.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
Working Paper: Global Demographic Change: Dimensions and Economic Significance (2005) Downloads
Journal Article: Global demographic change: dimensions and economic significance (2004) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:nbr:nberwo:10817

Ordering information: This working paper can be ordered from
http://www.nber.org/papers/w10817

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in NBER Working Papers from National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA 02138, U.S.A.. Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by ().

 
Page updated 2019-10-15
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:10817