EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Employers' Preferences for Gender, Age, Height and Beauty: Direct Evidence

Peter Kuhn () and Kailing Shen ()

No 15564, NBER Working Papers from National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc

Abstract: We study firms' advertised preferences for gender, age, height and beauty in a sample of ads from a Chinese internet job board, and interpret these patterns using a simple employer search model. We find that these characteristics are widely and highly valued by Chinese employers, though employers' valuations are highly specific to detailed jobs and occupations. Consistent with our model, advertised preferences for gender, age, height and beauty all become less prevalent as job skill requirements rise. Cross-sectional patterns suggest some role for customer discrimination, product market competition, and corporate culture. Using the recent collapse of China's labor market as a natural experiment, we find that firms' advertised education and experience requirements respond to changing labor market conditions in the direction predicted by our model, while firms' advertised preferences for age, gender, height and beauty do not.

JEL-codes: J6 J7 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-bec, nep-cna, nep-lab and nep-tra
Date: 2009-12
Note: LS
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (6) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://www.nber.org/papers/w15564.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:nbr:nberwo:15564

Ordering information: This working paper can be ordered from
http://www.nber.org/papers/w15564

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in NBER Working Papers from National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA 02138, U.S.A.. Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by ().

 
Page updated 2019-07-27
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:15564