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Lab Labor: What Can Labor Economists Learn from the Lab?

Gary Charness () and Peter Kuhn ()

No 15913, NBER Working Papers from National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc

Abstract: This chapter surveys the contributions of laboratory experiments to labor economics. We begin with a discussion of methodological issues: why (and when) is a lab experiment the best approach; how do laboratory experiments compare to field experiments; and what are the main design issues? We then summarize the substantive contributions of laboratory experiments to our understanding of principal-agent interactions, social preferences, union-firm bargaining, arbitration, gender differentials, discrimination, job search, and labor markets more generally.

JEL-codes: C9 J0 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2010-04
Note: LS
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Published as “Lab Labor: What Can Labor Economist s Learn from the Lab?” (with Gary Charness), in Orley Ashenfelter and David Card, eds., Handbook of Labor Economics , volume 4 A . Amsterdam : North Holland, 2011, pp. 229 - 330.

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Chapter: Lab Labor: What Can Labor Economists Learn from the Lab? (2011) Downloads
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